• Another great traditional yiḏaki from a busy maker from Dhalinybuy outstation, about 2 hours drive from Nhulunbuy. The backpressure is medium to high, the instrument is responsive, the toot is easy to hit. The sound is a little bit confined and a ‘dirty’ feel that I like very much. The bright and stunning painting is made by using natural colours, the design is one of the most used Daṯiwuy clan pattern painted by Ŋoŋu.

    Listen to this mago here:
  • Another great work from Ŋoŋu with balanced sound and backpressure, medium volume and good quality craftsmanship. I recommend this instrument for those, who are following the traditional playing techniques of the Northeast Arnhem Land region.

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  • This instrument might be a challenging one for many players due to its extremely high backpressure. Although yiḏaki with high pressure is not popular amongst the (non-Indigenous) players, I often recommend these instruments to challenge skills and muscles. It also helps you to understand the dynamics of the didgeridoo in general. So if you do not have one, here is one for you from a master maker on a good price!

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  • A simple but great yiḏaki from Djarrkpi outstation, about 3 hours drive from Yirrkala. The humble size and shape of the instrument do not give us a hint what is inside: surprisingly clear sound with medium backpressure and easy transition between the drone and toot. We recommend this didgeridoo for both contemporary and traditional players, however someone who would like to tap into the traditional playing styles of Northeast Arnhem Land would be grateful to own this stick.

    Key: E/G# Lenght: 123cm Mouthpiece internal diameter: 3cm Available from Yirrkala, NT Australia with worldwide shipping For details and specifications see 'Additional information' tab below. Listen to this yiḏaki here:
  • Another great yiḏaki delivered by Marikuku. The instrument is easy to play with medium backpressure and easy transition between the dups and the drone. The sound is rich in acoustics, the wall of the instrument is solid and nicely finished at the outside. I recommend this instrument for those, who are looking for a top-quality yiḏaki to practice traditional rhythms.

    For details and specifications see the 'Additional information' tab below. Listen to this yiḏaki here:
  • An excellent yiḏaki from Marikuku, painted with natural pigments. The backpressure is medium, therefore the instrument is easy to play; the dups sound really great and compliment the rich acoustics of the instrument. I recommend this instrument for both art collectors and yiḏaki players who look for instruments with high cultural integrity.

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  • A stunning-looking yiḏaki by Marikuku, who creates top-quality instruments. If you have a look on the photos of the mouth and bell, you can see how much attention he pays to the finish of his work: perfect round shapes, and comfortable edges. The sound has a nice warm feel, the medium backpressure lets the player flow with the rhythm. The painting depicts gaḏayka marwat, the leafs of the stringybark tree.

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  • An excellent yiḏaki from Marikuku, who is one of the best didgeridoo makers of the Northeast Arnhem Land region. It has a nice, warm growly sound with medium backpressure and great response rate – easy transition between the drone and the toot. I recommend this instrument for traditional players, however it is a great choice for those as well, who  follow contemporary playing styles.

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  • Here is a good opportunity for yiḏaki-nerds: a used ceremonial instrument from Marikuku with great playing characteristics. The chamber is tight at the top and opens up towards the bell (look at the shape of this instrument!), the dups are really easy to hit and sound amazing; the volume is high, the instrument responds well and does whatever the players wishes to hear. It is a heavily used stick, the timber had to cope with a lot and washed through many times. The sound currently is quite dry, that lights up with some water inside. The instrument is cracked at the bell, that is held together with silver duct tape. This yiḏaki is a great example of didgeridoos favoured by Yolŋu ceremonial players nowadays, so we recommend it for collectors who want to get a hold of a unique instrument.

    Key: G/G# Lenght: 134.5cm Mouthpiece internal diameter: 2.8cm Available from Yirrkala, NT Australia with worldwide shipping For details and specifications see 'Additional information' tab below. Listen to this yiḏaki here:
  • A pretty instrument with slim body, medium to high backpressure and lots of high tones in the sound. The internal chamber is quite thin all the way through, that gives an interesting feel to this mago: if you push the air in with the support of your lower stomach, you can hear crisp, higher tones. This stick sings in C#. I recommend this excellent mako for traditional players.

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  • An excellent 'gun' coming under the name of Bob Burruwal's wife. Lena is a prominent artist of the Maningrida region, she often creates artworks in collaboration with her husband and family. This stick reminds me instruments made by Bob in the 'old days': open bore, full-bodied resonant sound, medium, well-balanced backpressure. Once this stick warmed up, you cannot stop playing it, amazing acoustics, volume and power. Highly recommended for traditional players.

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  • A unique opportunity for collectors to own a rustic, old-school mako made by senior songman and didgeridoo maker Jack Nawilil. As you can see on the photos, the outside of the instrument is course, the mouthpiece and the bell are natural. The backpressure is quite low, therefore the player needs to acquire control over the airflow. The sound has an interesting echoey taste, that you might be able to hear in the sound sample. The timber is dry, naturally I would recommend oil in the inside, however it might change the unique acoustics of this instrument. I recommend this great mako for those players, who are looking for something unique to update their collection.

    Key: C Lenght: 133.5cm Mouthpiece internal diameter: 4.3cm, the mouthpiece is waxed Available from Yirrkala, NT Australia with worldwide shipping Listen to this mako here:
  • A very nice traditional instrument with a beautiful shape and clear lines. The open bore provides medium backpressure and spacious acoustics. The drone and toots are easy to play. The size of the mouthpiece might be a too wide for some, but it can be easily reduced with wax. We recommend this instrument for someone who is looking for a special but simple traditional didgeridoo.

    Listen to this yiḏaki here:
  • Dhapa is constantly delivering top-quality didgeridoos for the last few years, it is not surprising, that he is one of the most popular makers of the Northeast Arnhem Land region. His instruments are sought not only by ŋäpaki (non-Indigenous people), but I also often see his instruments played by Yolŋu players during performances or public ceremonies. This instrument is a great example of Dhapa’s work, the plain timber highlights his attention to detail and effort to give fine finish to his works. The mouthpiece and the bell are perfectly shaped, as you run your hands through the surface you can feel the maker’s refined vision and intention to provide high-quality artwork. Its sound is rich in overtones and bass; the switch between the drone and the trumpet-sound is effortless, the ‘dups’ are very easy to hit. We recommend this instrument for both contemporary and traditional players.

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  • A 100% top-yiḏaki by Dhapa. It has a surprisingly powerful sound with medium to high backpressure, and warm sound that is rich in overtones. The walls are thin that gives a way new feeling to the instrument, it is very enjoyable to play! I highly recommend this stick for those, who are following the traditional playing styles of Northeast Arnhem Land.

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  • A top-player instrument for those who wish to practice the kunborrk style of Central and West Arnhem Land. This instrument has exceptional acoustics and resonance with medium backpressure and solid, but resonant body. I highly recommend this excellent mago for traditional players, who want to sharpen their skills on West Arnhem style.

    Key: Eb Lenght: 132.7cm Mouthpiece internal diameter: 3.5-3.7cm, the mouthpiece is waxed Available from Yirrkala, NT Australia with worldwide shipping Listen to this mako here:
  • An excellent instrument, a good example of mako played in the Central-Arnhem Land region to accompany kun-borrk songs: the spacious internal chamber and large bell produces exceptional volume, resonance and acoustics, the backpressure is medium and supports the player to create the characteristic 'pulling-sound'. The artwork is detailed and beautiful, painted with natural pigments. I recommend this superb instrument for those, who are looking for a mako of the lifetime.

    Key: E Lenght: 139.5cm Mouthpiece internal diameter: 4.3cm, the mouthpiece is waxed Available from Yirrkala, NT Australia with worldwide shipping Listen to this mako here:
  • A top-player instrument for those who wish to practice the kunborrk style of Central and West Arnhem Land. This instrument has a characteristic sound and resonance with medium backpressure, plenty of acoustics and solid, but resonant body. I highly recommend this excellent mako for traditional players, who want to sharpen their skills on West Arnhem style.

    Listen to this mako here:
  • A slow-player mako in the lower key-range. Due to its low backpressure and resonance, it is a quite meditative instrument. Once I poured water through the inside, the sound got rich in overtones, so I would recommend for the future owner to oil the timber in order to reach its real potential.

    Key: C# Length: 126cm Mouthpiece internal diameter: 4-4.5cm, the mouthpiece is waxed Available from Yirrkala, NT Australia with worldwide shipping Listen to this mako here:

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