• I had a few yiḏaki from Yalpi in my hands, all of them have similar characteristics: the simple finish, the marks of the machete that is used to shape the instrument, the extremely good playability and the feel that you hold a ‘classic’ traditional yiḏaki in your hands. It has a comfortable mouthpiece, well-balanced backpressure and rich sound. The transition between the drone and the ‘dups’ is very easy, and sound really good. If you read Yalpi’s bio (click on his name above) you can be sure, that you found an instrument with high cultural integrity. The miny’tji (design) depicts one of the most powerful Gumatj totem, the gurtha (fire). I recommend this yiḏaki for traditional players.

    Listen to this mago here:
  • A great example of a classic bush-yiḏaki made with only hand tools: a machete, a chisel, and sand paper. The result is a 100% organic didgeridoo! The walls are quite thick, therefore the instrument has some weight; the maker took some wood off at the upper part of the instrument, the bottom section left untouched, looks as it is under the bark. The bell saw a chisel, however as you look inside the instrument you can see the natural bore, that makes this yiḏaki – at least in my eyes – a perfect didgeridoo. Is is really easy to play, the switch between the drone and the toot is effortless, the sound is rich, and has a good volume. I recommend this excellent stick for those, who are practising the traditional playing styles of Northeast Arnhem Land, and want to get a solid instrument to take anywhere in any conditions.

    Listen to this mago here:
  • It is unusual to find a yiḏaki that is made in Birritjimi – at Djalu’s workshop – with thin walls and highly resonant body; sticks made by either Larry or Djalu have thick, solid walls and powerful, ‘boomy’ sound. This instrument is different – and that is why I wanted to have it in the stock! The narrow neck opens up to an open aperture, the backpressure is medium to low that makes me to feel that this is a slow-player instrument – even though I find it easy to speed up the rhythm. What I enjoy in this yiḏaki is the warm, resonant sound that flows the sound, and drifts you away. Contemporary players would find much joy in this excellent instrument as well as trad-fans.

    Listen to this yiḏaki here:
  • Including a copy of the Waṉḏawuy – Mulka Manikay Archives CD

    A unique instrument recommended for collectors who look for something different. Wapurpurr is one of my favourite yiḏaki makers, who live in Waṉḏawuy outstation, about 2.5 hours drive from Yirrkala. He is a ceremonial player, that is clearly reflected in his instruments. This didgeridoo has an open bore, medium backpressure, full-bodied sound with rick acoustics. What makes this instrument special is the artwork that is carved and painted with natural pigments, it depicts two snakes visually moving along the body of the instrument – stunning effect, very well done Wapurpurr! We recommend this rare artwork for collectors. We hope, that the future owner will enjoy listening to the Mulka Manikay Archives Waṉḏawuy recording that accompanies the instrument, featuring Wapurpurr on yiḏaki.

    Listen to this mago here:
  • A nice and simple didgeridoo for those, who are looking for an easy-to-handle and easy-to-play stick to practice traditional rhythms. It has an open bore, medium backpressure, nice toot, and surprisingly good volume. Good work from Waṉḏawuy!

    Listen to this mago here:
  • A good opportunity for collectors to get an old mago-style traditional instrument that we obtained from an art collector in 2010, who purchased it from a local maker in Batchelor community sometimes in the late '80s. Even though it was sitting in a wardrobe for a few decades, the marks on its body suggest it used to be played. Due to the length of the instrument and the natural internal chamber, the backpressure is quite low. The sound is somewhat dry - that is mainly due to the few decades while it was sitting in a wardrobe. Once it is watered through, the depth of the sound opens up and makes it enjoyable to play. A great old-style didgeridoo for those, who are practicing the West Arnhem traditional playing styles.

    Key: B Lenght: 153cm Mouthpiece internal diameter: 3.5cm (waxed) Available from Yirrkala, NT Australia with worldwide shipping For details and specifications see the 'Additional information' tab below. Listen to this mago here:
  • A unique opportunity for those, who are looking for a high-pitched super-fast yiḏaki. Since the backpressure is high, I do recommend this instrument for experienced players. A light stick with thin walls, the internal aperture is open and tapered; the dup's are easy to hit - but then again, you need experience to reach the full potential of this great instrument. Here is another beautiful artwork from one of the best yiḏaki makers of our time.

    Key: G/F# Lenght: 133cm Mouthpiece internal diameter: 3.3cm Available from Yirrkala, NT Australia with worldwide shipping For details and specifications see 'Additional information' tab below. Listen to this yiḏaki here:
  • A top-quality yiḏaki from Northeast Arnhem Land with high cultural integrity and superb playing qualities. The sound has rich acoustics, and warm characteristics. The dups are easy to hit, the backpressure is in the medium range. I recommend this instrument for those players, who are looking for a two-in-one instrument to practice traditional playing styles painted with stunning Yolŋu miny'tji.

    Key: Eb-E/F# Lenght: 140cm Mouthpiece internal diameter: 3cm Available from Yirrkala, NT Australia with worldwide shipping For details and specifications see 'Additional information' tab below. Listen to this yiḏaki here:
  • One of the best instrument we have in the stock at the moment. A classic stick from Ŋoŋu: balanced instrument with high backpressure, the transition between the drone and the toot is easy and sound absolutely fantastic (I cannot stop hitting the dups), and the artwork has high cultural integrity. I cannot speak highly enough about this instrument, I recommend it to those players who are practicing traditional playing styles. You won't be disappointed!

    Listen to this yiḏaki here:
  • A solid yiḏaki from Ŋoṉu with thick walls and great acoustics. The mouthpiece is comfortable, the bell is well worked-out, the backpressure is medium and lets you to roll rhythms effortless. The dups are easy to hit and sound great above the drone. The sound is rich and has lots of depth to it, especially when the instrument is warmed up. I recommend this instrument for those traditional and contemporary players who are looking for a great traditional didgeridoo.

    Listen to this yiḏaki here:
  • A classic stick from Ŋoŋu: well balanced instrument with confined chamber, medium to high backpressure and top-quality craftsmanship. The mouthpiece is comfortable, the toot is easy to hit and sound great. I recommend this instrument for players who are following traditional playing styles.

    Listen to this yiḏaki here:
  • Another great traditional yiḏaki from a busy maker from Dhalinybuy outstation, about 2 hours drive from Nhulunbuy. The backpressure is medium to high, the instrument is responsive, the toot is easy to hit. The sound is a little bit confined and a ‘dirty’ feel that I like very much. The bright and stunning painting is made by using natural colours, the design is one of the most used Daṯiwuy clan pattern painted by Ŋoŋu.

    Listen to this mago here:
  • This instrument might be a challenging one for many players due to its extremely high backpressure. Although yiḏaki with high pressure is not popular amongst the (non-Indigenous) players, I often recommend these instruments to challenge skills and muscles. It also helps you to understand the dynamics of the didgeridoo in general. So if you do not have one, here is one for you from a master maker on a good price!

    Listen to this yiḏaki here:
  • A stunning-looking yiḏaki by Marikuku, who creates top-quality instruments. If you have a look on the photos of the mouth and bell, you can see how much attention he pays to the finish of his work: perfect round shapes, and comfortable edges. The sound has a nice warm feel, the medium backpressure lets the player flow with the rhythm. The painting depicts gaḏayka marwat, the leafs of the stringybark tree.

    Listen to this mago here:
  • An excellent yiḏaki from Marikuku, who is one of the best didgeridoo makers of the Northeast Arnhem Land region. It has a nice, warm growly sound with medium backpressure and great response rate – easy transition between the drone and the toot. I recommend this instrument for traditional players, however it is a great choice for those as well, who  follow contemporary playing styles.

    Listen to this mago here:
  • A pretty instrument with slim body, medium to high backpressure and lots of high tones in the sound. The internal chamber is quite thin all the way through, that gives an interesting feel to this mako: if you push the air in with the support of your lower stomach, you can hear crisp, higher tones. This stick sings in C#. I recommend this excellent mako for traditional players.

    Key: C# Length: 128.5cm Mouthpiece internal diameter: 3-3.5cm Available from NSW, Australia with worldwide shipping Listen to this mako here:
  • An excellent 'gun' coming under the name of Bob Burruwal's wife. Lena is a prominent artist of the Maningrida region, she often creates artworks in collaboration with her husband and family. This stick reminds me instruments made by Bob in the 'old days': open bore, full-bodied resonant sound, medium, well-balanced backpressure. Once this stick warmed up, you cannot stop playing it, amazing acoustics, volume and power. Highly recommended for traditional players.

    Listen to this mago here:
  • A unique opportunity for collectors to own a rustic, old-school mako made by senior songman and didgeridoo maker Jack Nawilil. As you can see on the photos, the outside of the instrument is course, the mouthpiece and the bell are natural. The backpressure is quite low, therefore the player needs to acquire control over the airflow. The sound has an interesting echoey taste, that you might be able to hear in the sound sample. The timber is dry, naturally I would recommend oil in the inside, however it might change the unique acoustics of this instrument. I recommend this great mako for those players, who are looking for something unique to update their collection.

    Key: C Lenght: 133.5cm Mouthpiece internal diameter: 4.3cm, the mouthpiece is waxed Available from Yirrkala, NT Australia with worldwide shipping Listen to this mako here:

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