• A great example of a classic bush-yiḏaki made with only hand tools: a machete, a chisel, and sand paper. The result is a 100% organic didgeridoo! The walls are quite thick, therefore the instrument has some weight; the maker took some wood off at the upper part of the instrument, the bottom section left untouched, looks as it is under the bark. The bell saw a chisel, however as you look inside the instrument you can see the natural bore, that makes this yiḏaki – at least in my eyes – a perfect didgeridoo. Is is really easy to play, the switch between the drone and the toot is effortless, the sound is rich, and has a good volume. I recommend this excellent stick for those, who are practising the traditional playing styles of Northeast Arnhem Land, and want to get a solid instrument to take anywhere in any conditions.

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  • A unique opportunity for collectors to own a rustic, old-school mako made by senior songman and didgeridoo maker Jack Nawilil. As you can see on the photos, the outside of the instrument is course, the mouthpiece and the bell are natural. The backpressure is quite low, therefore the player needs to acquire control over the airflow. The sound has an interesting echoey taste, that you might be able to hear in the sound sample. The timber is dry, naturally I would recommend oil in the inside, however it might change the unique acoustics of this instrument. I recommend this great mako for those players, who are looking for something unique to update their collection.

    Key: C Lenght: 133.5cm Mouthpiece internal diameter: 4.3cm, the mouthpiece is waxed Available from Yirrkala, NT Australia with worldwide shipping Listen to this mako here:
  • This instrument might be a challenging one for many players due to its extremely high backpressure. Although yiḏaki with high pressure is not popular amongst the (non-Indigenous) players, I often recommend these instruments to challenge skills and muscles. It also helps you to understand the dynamics of the didgeridoo in general. So if you do not have one, here is one for you from a master maker on a good price!

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  • A good opportunity for collectors to get an old mago-style traditional instrument that we obtained from an art collector in 2010, who purchased it from a local maker in Batchelor community sometimes in the late '80s. Even though it was sitting in a wardrobe for a few decades, the marks on its body suggest it used to be played. Due to the length of the instrument and the natural internal chamber, the backpressure is quite low. The sound is somewhat dry - that is mainly due to the few decades while it was sitting in a wardrobe. Once it is watered through, the depth of the sound opens up and makes it enjoyable to play. A great old-style didgeridoo for those, who are practicing the West Arnhem traditional playing styles.

    Key: B Lenght: 153cm Mouthpiece internal diameter: 3.5cm (waxed) Available from Yirrkala, NT Australia with worldwide shipping For details and specifications see the 'Additional information' tab below. Listen to this mago here:
  • I had a few yiḏaki from Yalpi in my hands, all of them have similar characteristics: the simple finish, the marks of the machete that is used to shape the instrument, the extremely good playability and the feel that you hold a ‘classic’ traditional yiḏaki in your hands. It has a comfortable mouthpiece, well-balanced backpressure and rich sound. The transition between the drone and the ‘dups’ is very easy, and sound really good. If you read Yalpi’s bio (click on his name above) you can be sure, that you found an instrument with high cultural integrity. The miny’tji (design) depicts one of the most powerful Gumatj totem, the gurtha (fire). I recommend this yiḏaki for traditional players.

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  • An excellent yiḏaki from Marikuku, who is one of the best didgeridoo makers of the Northeast Arnhem Land region. It has a nice, warm growly sound with medium backpressure and great response rate – easy transition between the drone and the toot. I recommend this instrument for traditional players, however it is a great choice for those as well, who  follow contemporary playing styles.

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  • A high-resonant stick with thin walls and large internal chamber. The backpressure is low, therefore this instrument is quite relaxed and easy to play; the sound is rich in acoustics, deep and warm. The mouthpiece does not have wax at the moment, although it will be required since the opening is quite large. A great mago for kunborrk style!

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  • A slow-player mako in the lower key-range. Due to its low backpressure and resonance, it is a quite meditative instrument. Once I poured water through the inside, the sound got rich in overtones, so I would recommend for the future owner to oil the timber in order to reach its real potential.

    Key: C# Length: 126cm Mouthpiece internal diameter: 4-4.5cm, the mouthpiece is waxed Available from Yirrkala, NT Australia with worldwide shipping Listen to this mako here:
  • A nice and simple didgeridoo for those, who are looking for an easy-to-handle and easy-to-play stick to practice traditional rhythms. It has an open bore, medium backpressure, nice toot, and surprisingly good volume. Good work from Waṉḏawuy!

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  • A classic stick from Ŋoŋu: well balanced instrument with confined chamber, medium to high backpressure and top-quality craftsmanship. The mouthpiece is comfortable, the toot is easy to hit and sound great. I recommend this instrument for players who are following traditional playing styles.

    Listen to this yiḏaki here:
  • Another top-quality Dhaḻwaŋu yiḏaki from Balku; the backpressure is well balanced, the transition between the drone and the toot is easy, the sound is direct and rish. I recommend this yiḏaki for those, who are looking for a traditional instrument with high cultural integrity to practice the traditional playing techniques of East Arnhem.

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  • A pretty instrument with slim body, medium to high backpressure and lots of high tones in the sound. The internal chamber is quite thin all the way through, that gives an interesting feel to this mago: if you push the air in with the support of your lower stomach, you can hear crisp, higher tones. This stick sings in C#. I recommend this excellent mako for traditional players.

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  • It is unusual to find a yiḏaki that is made in Birritjimi – at Djalu’s workshop – with thin walls and highly resonant body; sticks made by either Larry or Djalu have thick, solid walls and powerful, ‘boomy’ sound. This instrument is different – and that is why I wanted to have it in the stock! The narrow neck opens up to an open aperture, the backpressure is medium to low that makes me to feel that this is a slow-player instrument – even though I find it easy to speed up the rhythm. What I enjoy in this yiḏaki is the warm, resonant sound that flows the sound, and drifts you away. Contemporary players would find much joy in this excellent instrument as well as trad-fans.

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  • A 100% top-yiḏaki by Dhapa. It has a surprisingly powerful sound with medium to high backpressure, and warm sound that is rich in overtones. The walls are thin that gives a way new feeling to the instrument, it is very enjoyable to play! I highly recommend this stick for those, who are following the traditional playing styles of Northeast Arnhem Land.

    Listen to this mago here:
  • A solid yiḏaki from Ŋoṉu with thick walls and great acoustics. The mouthpiece is comfortable, the bell is well worked-out, the backpressure is medium and lets you to roll rhythms effortless. The dups are easy to hit and sound great above the drone. The sound is rich and has lots of depth to it, especially when the instrument is warmed up. I recommend this instrument for those traditional and contemporary players who are looking for a great traditional didgeridoo.

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  • A great Dhaḻwaŋu yiḏaki from one of the most productive makers; the backpressure is balanced, therefore the instruments plays effortless with a good power, volume and transition between the drone and the toot. I recommend this yiḏaki for those, who are looking for a traditional instrument with high cultural integrity to practice the traditional playing techniques of East Arnhem.

    Listen to this yiḏaki here:
  • Another great traditional yiḏaki from a busy maker from Dhalinybuy outstation, about 2 hours drive from Nhulunbuy. The backpressure is medium to high, the instrument is responsive, the toot is easy to hit. The sound is a little bit confined and a ‘dirty’ feel that I like very much. The bright and stunning painting is made by using natural colours, the design is one of the most used Daṯiwuy clan pattern painted by Ŋoŋu.

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  • Dhapa is constantly delivering top-quality didgeridoos for the last few years, it is not surprising, that he is one of the most popular makers of the Northeast Arnhem Land region. His instruments are sought not only by ŋäpaki (non-Indigenous people), but I also often see his instruments played by Yolŋu players during performances or public ceremonies. This instrument is a great example of Dhapa’s work, the plain timber highlights his attention to detail and effort to give fine finish to his works. The mouthpiece and the bell are perfectly shaped, as you run your hands through the surface you can feel the maker’s refined vision and intention to provide high-quality artwork. Its sound is rich in overtones and bass; the switch between the drone and the trumpet-sound is effortless, the ‘dups’ are very easy to hit. We recommend this instrument for both contemporary and traditional players.

    Listen to this yiḏaki here:

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