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  • A great Dhaḻwaŋu yiḏaki from one of the most productive makers; the backpressure is balanced, therefore the instruments plays effortless with a good power, volume and transition between the drone and the toot. I recommend this yiḏaki for those, who are looking for a traditional instrument with high cultural integrity to practice the traditional playing techniques of East Arnhem.

    Listen to this yiḏaki here:
  • Bibibak Munuŋgurr is a well known yiḏaki maker nowadays. When I come across with his work, I am always sure, that the good sound quality of his instruments is guaranteed. Bibibak is a ceremonial player, so he exactly knows what the good yiḏaki is. This instrument is a nice bush-yiḏaki with natural bore – that is, in my opinion, ideal – and sharp edges at both ends of the stick. The instrument plays easy, the rich and ‘bassy’ drone comes effortless, the back pressure is medium, the transition between the drone and the toot is easy. It is a really fun-to-play yiḏaki! The painting is not the best quality, the instrument had been repainted, that doesn’t add to its value for many players, that’s why I dropped the price – it shouldn’t confuse you though, the playing qualities comes first!

    Listen to this yiḏaki here: sound sample coming soon....
  • An old-style yiḏaki with slim body, confined chamber and super-nice growl; this instrument has a quite low backpressure, but great playabilities. The sound feels deep and earthy, the toot is easy to play and sound great over the drone. I recommend this instrument for those, who are looking for 'something different'.

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  • A very ‘slow-player’ instrument with deep, relaxed sound from Maningrida, North-Central Arnhem Land. The walls are quite thick all the way along the body, that’s why it’s a heavy stick. I had to spend some time to find the sound I was looking for in this instrument, since the play-ability is unbalanced and the backpressure is low. A very slow-moving stick with good bass and overtones after a few minutes of playing. The painting depicts ceremonial body pendants.

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  • An easy to play yiḏaki from Dhapa, with medium backpressure, tight bore and good transition between the drone and the dups. As you can hear in the sound sample, the sound is down to earth; to be honest, D is not my favourite key, however after a warm up I was very comfortable to spend more time with this stick. I recommend it for both traditional and contemporary players.

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  • A 100% top-yiḏaki by Dhapa. It has a surprisingly powerful sound with medium to high backpressure, and warm sound that is rich in overtones. The walls are thin that gives a way new feeling to the instrument, it is very enjoyable to play! I highly recommend this stick for those, who are following the traditional playing styles of Northeast Arnhem Land.

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  • Dhapa is constantly delivering top-quality didgeridoos for the last few years, it is not surprising, that he is one of the most popular makers of the Northeast Arnhem Land region. His instruments are sought not only by ŋäpaki (non-Indigenous people), but I also often see his instruments played by Yolŋu players during performances or public ceremonies. This instrument is a great example of Dhapa’s work, the plain timber highlights his attention to detail and effort to give fine finish to his works. The mouthpiece and the bell are perfectly shaped, as you run your hands through the surface you can feel the maker’s refined vision and intention to provide high-quality artwork. Its sound is rich in overtones and bass; the switch between the drone and the trumpet-sound is effortless, the ‘dups’ are very easy to hit. We recommend this instrument for both contemporary and traditional players.

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  • [/fusion_soundcloud]A superb yiḏaki from Dhapa with excellent playing qualities: open bore, medium backpressure, easy to hit toot, super responsive and has powerful, rich sound. I recommend this instrument for players who wish to sharpen their traditional playing style.

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  • A simple, easy-to-use stick from Master Dhapa for those players, who are looking for a light-weight instrument. It has an open, spacious chamber, medium backpressure and a slim body. The mouthpiece is comfortable, the bell is well-worked out, the wall is quite thin and resonant. A great choice for both contemporary and traditional players.

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  • Another great yiḏaki from Dhapa: open bore, clean finish, medium backpressure, easy to hit toot, rich sound. I recommend this instrument for traditional players.

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  • An easy to play yiḏaki from Dhapa, with medium backpressure, tight bore and good transition between the drone and the dups. I recommend it for both traditional and contemporary players

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  • Many of our customers are interested in buying a natural instrument from Master Djalu’ – here it is one! The aperture along the top of the instrument is confined, therefore the backpressure is quite high, that can be challenging for many players. I always encourage customers to challenge their skills, and purchase an instrument like this, since it will help to understand the dynamics of a highly-charged yiḏaki – instead of playing fast, try slow rhythms and melodic beats. This instrument is very responsive, the ‘dups’ are easy to hit, the sound has a very high resonance with plenty of overtones. This yiḏaki is a good deal for those, who are looking for something different to update their stock.

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  • A slow-player instrument with a nice growl to its sound; even though the backpressure is quite low, the instrument is surprisingly responsive and easy to play. the walls are thick, the chamber is somewhat confined at the top-section of the body. I recommend this great didgeridoo for those, who wish to try an old-style yiḏaki.

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  • A simple instrument from The Master: it has quite open bore, short body and low backpressure. We recommend this instrument for those, who are looking for a beginner-class, easy to use and handle traditional didgeridoo made by one of the most popular didgeridoo makers of our age.

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  • A fast player instrument with high backpressure and 'drity' acoustics. The toots are quite easy to hit, and the sound is quite confined due to the tight chamber and tick walls. I recommend this instrument for experienced players.

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  • A very nice traditional instrument with a beautiful shape and clear lines. The open bore provides medium backpressure and spacious acoustics. The drone and toots are easy to play. The size of the mouthpiece might be a too wide for some, but it can be easily reduced with wax. We recommend this instrument for someone who is looking for a special but simple traditional didgeridoo.

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  • A great traditional didgeridoo with Waŋurri clan design. The wall of the instrument is solid, therefore it is quite heavy, the shape and the overall finish compliments the skills of the maker. The mouthpiece is well-shaped, back-pressure is high, the sound is powerful, somewhat confined and ‘dirty’, that makes this stick unique. You might find this instrument a little challenging, but we do believe, that it is one of the highlights of this great yiḏaki since it is able to teach you lessons that you can’t get anywhere else.

    Listen to this yiḏaki here: sound sample coming soon...
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  • A simple but great yiḏaki for those, who are practising the traditional playing style of Northeast Arnhem Land. There is a lack of high notes, therefore the sound feels a little bit blunt, however it does change after washing through the instrument – it was a great surprise during the sound recording. This stick is easy to play, the backpressure is medium, and the ‘dups’ are easy to hit. The wall of the instrument is solid, the finish on the outside is nice and smooth, the mouthpiece is convenient. Lovely instrument, do not miss it!

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  • An excellent yiḏaki from Marikuku, who is one of the best didgeridoo makers of the Northeast Arnhem Land region. It has a nice, warm growly sound with medium backpressure and great response rate – easy transition between the drone and the toot. I recommend this instrument for traditional players, however it is a great choice for those as well, who  follow contemporary playing styles.

    Listen to this mago here:
  • An excellent yiḏaki from Marikuku, painted with natural pigments. The backpressure is medium, therefore the instrument is easy to play; the dups sound really great and compliment the rich acoustics of the instrument. I recommend this instrument for both art collectors and yiḏaki players who look for instruments with high cultural integrity.

    Listen to this yiḏaki here:

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