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See below the selection of didgeridoos made in Northeast and West Arnhem Land

  • A great Dhaḻwaŋu yiḏaki from one of the most productive makers; the backpressure is balanced, therefore the instruments plays effortless with a good power, volume and transition between the drone and the toot. I recommend this yiḏaki for those, who are looking for a traditional instrument with high cultural integrity to practice the traditional playing techniques of East Arnhem.

    Listen to this yiḏaki here:
  • Another top-quality Dhaḻwaŋu yiḏaki from Balku; the backpressure is well balanced, the transition between the drone and the toot is easy, the sound is direct and rish. I recommend this yiḏaki for those, who are looking for a traditional instrument with high cultural integrity to practice the traditional playing techniques of East Arnhem.

    Listen to this yiḏaki here:
  • Bibibak Munuŋgurr is a well known yiḏaki maker nowadays. When I come across with his work, I am always sure, that the good sound quality of his instruments is guaranteed. Bibibak is a ceremonial player, so he exactly knows what the good yiḏaki is. This instrument is a nice bush-yiḏaki with natural bore – that is, in my opinion, ideal – and sharp edges at both ends of the stick. The instrument plays easy, the rich and ‘bassy’ drone comes effortless, the back pressure is medium, the transition between the drone and the toot is easy. It is a really fun-to-play yiḏaki! The painting is not the best quality, the instrument had been repainted, that doesn’t add to its value for many players, that’s why I dropped the price – it shouldn’t confuse you though, the playing qualities comes first!

    Listen to this yiḏaki here: sound sample coming soon....
  • An old-style yiḏaki with slim body, confined chamber and super-nice growl; this instrument has a quite low backpressure, but great playabilities. The sound feels deep and earthy, the toot is easy to play and sound great over the drone. I recommend this instrument for those, who are looking for 'something different'.

    Listen to this yiḏaki here:
  • This mago is a great opportunity for collectors who wish to have an original Bob Burruwal mago in their collection, since Old Man is not making many instruments anymore. It is a lightweight and tiny stick, with natural curved shape. The internal aperture is confined, and the medium backpressure is well balanced; the air flows through easy and effortless. The sound is rich in overtones and has a surprising depth to it. I recommend this instrument for traditional players only.

    Listen to this mago here:
  • A unique catch for collectors: and 'old-style instrument with a mouthpiece insert, sealed with sugarbag: an amazing artwork straight from the bush. The instrument has open chamber and plenty of internal space, the sound is resonant, warm, rich in acoustics and the backpressure is medium to low. I recommend this great mako for traditional players.

    Listen to this mago here:
  • A top-player instrument for those who wish to practice the kunborrk style of Central and West Arnhem Land. This instrument has a characteristic sound and resonance with medium backpressure, plenty of acoustics and solid, but resonant body. I highly recommend this excellent mago for traditional players, who want to sharpen their skills on West Arnhem style.

    Listen to this mago here:
  • A high-resonant stick with thin walls and large internal chamber. The backpressure is low, therefore this instrument is quite relaxed and easy to play; the sound is rich in acoustics, deep and warm. The mouthpiece does not have wax at the moment, although it will be required since the opening is quite large. A great mago for kunborrk style!

    Listen to this mago here:
  • An easy to play yiḏaki from Dhapa, with medium backpressure, tight bore and good transition between the drone and the dups. As you can hear in the sound sample, the sound is down to earth; to be honest, D is not my favourite key, however after a warm up I was very comfortable to spend more time with this stick. I recommend it for both traditional and contemporary players.

    Listen to this mago here:
  • Another great yiḏaki from Dhapa: open bore, clean finish, medium backpressure, easy to hit toot, rich sound. I recommend this instrument for traditional players.

    Listen to this yiḏaki here:
  • A powerful instrument from master Dhapa with impressive volume and acoustics. Due to the open bore the air flows through easy and the backpressure is medium. The wall of the instrument is quite thin at the mouthpiece and gradually gets ticker towards the bell. I recommend this excellent yiḏaki for anyone who wants to upgrade their collection.

    Listen to this yiḏaki here:
  • A simple but superb instrument from Dhapa: lightweight body with thin and resonant walls, open bore, great craftsmanship with high-end finish, rich acoustics with medium pressure and great playability...what else can we say?! Great value for money, do not miss it!

    Listen to this yiḏaki here:
  • An easy to play yiḏaki from Dhapa, with medium backpressure, tight bore and good transition between the drone and the dups. I recommend it for both traditional and contemporary players

    Listen to this yiḏaki here:
  • Many of our customers are interested in buying a natural instrument from Master Djalu’ – here it is one! The aperture along the top of the instrument is confined, therefore the backpressure is quite high, that can be challenging for many players. I always encourage customers to challenge their skills, and purchase an instrument like this, since it will help to understand the dynamics of a highly-charged yiḏaki – instead of playing fast, try slow rhythms and melodic beats. This instrument is very responsive, the ‘dups’ are easy to hit, the sound has a very high resonance with plenty of overtones. This yiḏaki is a good deal for those, who are looking for something different to update their stock.

    Listen to this yiḏaki here:
  • An extremely fast and versatile yiḏaki from Djalu's backyard from Birritjimi. Super responsive: sensitive to cheek, lips and tongue movements, the transition between the drone and the toot/dups is easy and fun to play. The sound is rich in overtones and has a good volume. I recommend this instrument for traditional players who are looking for a simple, easy to handle stick to practice fast rhythms. Collectors might also wish to note that this instrument is made of whoollybutt (Darwin Woollybutt/Eucalyptus miniata), that is an unusual material for yiḏaki.

    Listen to this yiḏaki here:

  • A great yiḏaki with elegant shape and open bell. The internal chamber is quite confined along the top section of the instrument, that give the sound a 'dirty' feel - that I like very much. The backpressure is medium to high, the transition between the toot and drone is easy. Even though the instrument is capable of faster rhythms, the slower, flowing tempo feels more natural on this stick.

    Listen to this yiḏaki here:

  • A classic yiḏaki from Master Djalu: the open internal chamber and the solid, resonant wall provides great acoustic, the transition between the drone and the toot is easy, the backpressure is medium and make this stick easy to play. This is a great deal to anyone who is looking for an excellent instrument from Djalu on an affordable price.

    Listen to this yiḏaki here:

  • A very nice traditional instrument with a beautiful shape and clear lines. The open bore provides medium backpressure and spacious acoustics. The drone and toots are easy to play. The size of the mouthpiece might be a too wide for some, but it can be easily reduced with wax. We recommend this instrument for someone who is looking for a special but simple traditional didgeridoo.

    Listen to this yiḏaki here:
  • A great traditional didgeridoo with Waŋurri clan design. The wall of the instrument is solid, therefore it is quite heavy, the shape and the overall finish compliments the skills of the maker. The mouthpiece is well-shaped, back-pressure is high, the sound is powerful, somewhat confined and ‘dirty’, that makes this stick unique. You might find this instrument a little challenging, but we do believe, that it is one of the highlights of this great yiḏaki since it is able to teach you lessons that you can’t get anywhere else.

    Listen to this yiḏaki here: sound sample coming soon...
  • An excellent 'gun' coming under the name of Bob Burruwal's wife. Lena is a prominent artist of the Maningrida region, she often creates artworks in collaboration with her husband and family. This stick reminds me instruments made by Bob in the 'old days': open bore, full-bodied resonant sound, medium, well-balanced backpressure. Once this stick warmed up, you cannot stop playing it, amazing acoustics, volume and power. Highly recommended for traditional players.

    Listen to this mago here:
  • A pretty instrument with slim body, medium to high backpressure and lots of high tones in the sound. The internal chamber is quite thin all the way through, that gives an interesting feel to this mago: if you push the air in with the support of your lower stomach, you can hear crisp, higher tones. This stick sings in C#. I recommend this excellent mako for traditional players.

    Listen to this mago here:

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