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  • A great example of a classic bush-yiḏaki made with only hand tools: a machete, a chisel, and sand paper. The result is a 100% organic didgeridoo! The walls are quite thick, therefore the instrument has some weight; the maker took some wood off at the upper part of the instrument, the bottom section left untouched, looks as it is under the bark. The bell saw a chisel, however as you look inside the instrument you can see the natural bore, that makes this yiḏaki – at least in my eyes – a perfect didgeridoo. Is is really easy to play, the switch between the drone and the toot is effortless, the sound is rich, and has a good volume. I recommend this excellent stick for those, who are practising the traditional playing styles of Northeast Arnhem Land, and want to get a solid instrument to take anywhere in any conditions.

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  • I had a few yiḏaki from Yalpi in my hands, all of them have similar characteristics: the simple finish, the marks of the machete that is used to shape the instrument, the extremely good playability and the feel that you hold a ‘classic’ traditional yiḏaki in your hands. It has a comfortable mouthpiece, well-balanced backpressure and rich sound. The transition between the drone and the ‘dups’ is very easy, and sound really good. If you read Yalpi’s bio (click on his name above) you can be sure, that you found an instrument with high cultural integrity. The miny’tji (design) depicts one of the most powerful Gumatj totem, the gurtha (fire). I recommend this yiḏaki for traditional players.

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