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  • Another essential resource for didgeridoo players who are interested in the traditional playing styles of the Top-End, recorded by prominent ethnomusicologist Alice M. Moyle in the '60s, released by AIATSIS in the early ’70s on vinyl, then later on audio CD; the current edition reprinted recently. The recordings capture of the sounds of the traditional Aboriginal Sound Instruments from Western Australia, Far-North Queensland and the Northern Territory. You can listen to rear instruments like seed pod rattles, goanna skin drums or the hollow log drum used only in ceremonial context, also clapsticks, boomerang and early recordings of different didgeridoos. Unfortunately the original booklet that contained many precious information is not supplied in this edition, however - due to the courtesy of AIATSIS -you can find the map of the sound instruments on our website. Find more information about the recordings here. The audio CDs are coming in slim CD cases. We highly recommend this resource for everybody who are keen to learn about the traditional music of Australia.
  • A great Dhaḻwaŋu yiḏaki from one of the most productive makers; the backpressure is balanced, therefore the instruments plays effortless with a good power, volume and transition between the drone and the toot. I recommend this yiḏaki for those, who are looking for a traditional instrument with high cultural integrity to practice the traditional playing techniques of East Arnhem.

    Listen to this yiḏaki here:
  • A great a versatile stick from one of the most famous makers of Northeast Arnhem Land. Since Mr B. Wunuŋmurra  passed away recently, this is one of the last opportunities to purchase an instrument made by him. After the instrument and its player warmed up, its sound is full of life, rich in low and high overtones; easy to play, responsive to every movements of the lips and tongue, the toot is easy to hit, suitable for fast playing. Beautiful shape and painting, I recommend this yiḏaki for traditional players and/or collectors.

    Listen to this mago here:
  • Another top-quality Dhaḻwaŋu yiḏaki from Balku; the backpressure is well balanced, the transition between the drone and the toot is easy, the sound is direct and rish. I recommend this yiḏaki for those, who are looking for a traditional instrument with high cultural integrity to practice the traditional playing techniques of East Arnhem.

    Listen to this yiḏaki here:
  • Many of you, who are interested in the traditional yiḏaki of Northeast Arnhem Land might be familiar with Djoŋgirriny, the traditional didgeridoo held by the Gälpu clan. As we can read in the booklet: “Djoŋgirriny refers to a concept that have flowed together since ancestral times. Djoŋgirriny is a deep and powerful sound, a sacred place, an ancient song. It is the name of the first yiḏaki belonging to the Gälpu clan who have held its sound since time immemorial.”
  • Bibibak Munuŋgurr is a well known yiḏaki maker nowadays. When I come across with his work, I am always sure, that the good sound quality of his instruments is guaranteed. Bibibak is a ceremonial player, so he exactly knows what the good yiḏaki is. This instrument is a nice bush-yiḏaki with natural bore – that is, in my opinion, ideal – and sharp edges at both ends of the stick. The instrument plays easy, the rich and ‘bassy’ drone comes effortless, the back pressure is medium, the transition between the drone and the toot is easy. It is a really fun-to-play yiḏaki! The painting is not the best quality, the instrument had been repainted, that doesn’t add to its value for many players, that’s why I dropped the price – it shouldn’t confuse you though, the playing qualities comes first!

    Listen to this yiḏaki here: sound sample coming soon....
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    Listen to this mago here: sound sample coming soon
  • Another great eye-catching instrument from Bibibak! It has a surprisingly high backpressure compared to its mid-range key, that needs to be handled by an experienced player – once you learn it, this yiḏaki becomes a powerful tool! It is a very responsive, fast-player yiḏaki, the toots are easy to hit, and as soon as it warmed up, the sound becomes rich in overtones. I recommend this instrument for those, who are practising the traditional playing styles of Northeast Arnhem Land.

    Listen to this mago here:
  • The clapsticks are one of the most ancient instruments in the world, used by many different traditions at every corner of our Planet. It plays an important part in the traditional Australian Aboriginal music as a rhythm keeper.
  • Dimensoins: Lenght 1: 36cm Lenght 2: 31.7cm Listen to the sound of this biḻma here:
    The price includes free worldwide shipping.
  • Dimensoins: Lenght 1: 30.6cm Lenght 2: 25.8cm Listen to the sound of this biḻma here:
    The price includes free worldwide shipping.
  • Dimensoins: Lenght 1: 40.5cm Lenght 2: 38cm Listen to the sound of this biḻma here:
    The price includes free worldwide shipping.
  • Dimensoins: Lenght 1: 35.5cm Lenght 2: 30.5cm Listen to the sound of this biḻma here:
    The price includes free worldwide shipping.
  • Dimensoins: Lenght 1: 28.5cm Lenght 2: 28.2cm Listen to the sound of this biḻma here:
    The price includes free worldwide shipping.
  • Dimensoins: Lenght 1: 37cm Lenght 2: 33cm Listen to the sound of this biḻma here:
    The price includes free worldwide shipping.
  • An old-style yiḏaki with slim body, confined chamber and super-nice growl; this instrument has a quite low backpressure, but great playabilities. The sound feels deep and earthy, the toot is easy to play and sound great over the drone. I recommend this instrument for those, who are looking for 'something different'.

    Listen to this yiḏaki here:
  • A great instrument with a slim body and sharp sound. Due to its high backpressure, I recommend this instrument for players who want to challenge their playing style, and learn more about instruments with high pressure. Suitable for fast playing! The painting is a sacred Waŋurri clan design, depicts mangrove worms (latjin), painted with natural ochre. The maker, Buwathay Munyarryun is a senior lawman, he is the songman on the Mulka Archives – Yilan recording, accompanied on yiḏaki by Bibibak Munuŋgurr.

    Listen to this mago here:
  • A great instrument from the Maningrida region from one of the busiest makers in the area; David Brian learnt his skills from his father, the renowned artist and didgeridoo master maker Bob Burruwal. David makes instrument for both ceremonial purposes and for sale – if you would like to see a few more examples of his work see the ‘sold didgeridoos’ menu, it is worth to check it out for visual pleasure! This particular instrument has a soft sound, that is – after about 5-10 minutes playing – reaches its real potential. The backpressure is quite low, therefore the player needs to learn to control the air-intake to get the best out of this great stick. I recommend this mago for those, who want to practice the traditional playing styles of West Arnhem Land, and prefer to do it alone, in a relaxed state.

    Listen to this mago here:
  • A very ‘slow-player’ instrument with deep, relaxed sound from Maningrida, North-Central Arnhem Land. The walls are quite thick all the way along the body, that’s why it’s a heavy stick. I had to spend some time to find the sound I was looking for in this instrument, since the play-ability is unbalanced and the backpressure is low. A very slow-moving stick with good bass and overtones after a few minutes of playing. The painting depicts ceremonial body pendants.

    Listen to this mago here:
  • Listen to this mago here:

     A slow-player instrument from Maningrida, North-Central Arnhem Land with deep, relaxed sound, good bass and overtones. Due to the length of it and the open bore all the way through its body, the backpressure is low – therefore we recommend this excellent mago for experienced players who have good control of the instrument. Its unique part is the mouthpiece insert fixed by glue, sealed by natural beeswax, that is a common way to reduce the internal aperture on instruments made in the Central-Arnhem region.

    The detailed painting depicts the vines of the yam, one of the staple food sources of the region.

  • A deep-tuned mago with open chamber and low backpressure recommended for players who are looking for an instrument to play slow, melodic rhythms. The sound is rich in acoustics, that are fired up after a few minutes of playing when the instrument warmed up.

    Listen to this mago here:

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